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Goat Medications

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IMPORTANT, PLEASSE READ: The following information has been complied for general reference and educational purposes only, and is not intended as a means of diagnosing and treating an animal. It is not intended, in any way to replace professional veterinary advice or care for your goats. The information presented here is not a comprehensive review these drugs and their uses. I am not a vet, do not pretend to be one, and do not consider myself an expert on goat medicine. The following information was originally compiled my me, for my own use, from various sources (on-line, books, anecdotally, and person experience) that reported the successful use of the following on goats, in the amounts listed. I am sharing it with you for general reference and educational purposes only. This information is presented without any guarantee, and I disclaim all liability in connection with the use of this information. The administration of all medications should be taken extremely seriously. Veterinary consultation is vital when diagnosing and treating sick animals. It is your, and your vet's, responsibility to make proper decisions concerning treatments and drug safety or effectiveness for a given situation. Never disregard veterinary advice, or delay in seeking it, as a result of information provided on this site. Please note that most of the doses given on this site are "extra label" (Extra label means that the dosage given for goats differs from that found on the bottle and/or the Food and Drug Administration has not cleared their use in goats). Extra-label use of any product in a food producing animal is illegal without a prescription from a veterinarian; that includes the milk withdrawal information.

Note on absence of meat withhold information: We are vegetarian, and not raise or sell goats for meat or meat related purposes. My site is for everyone, and I try to have it be thorough, but I do not gather information specific to killing goats, and so, I do not have it to share. The information on this page was originally compiled for my own use; I have no personal need for meat withhold times so I never collected it. The medications listed below probably do have meat withhold times; if you are looking for meat withdrawal information, you will have to research elsewhere.

Personal note on "Orthodox" Medications:

After many years of using "traditional" Western Medical practices and medicines on my goats, I began experimenting with Holistic, "Natural" & "Alternative" treatments. Nowadays I rely mainly on these Holistic treatments. I will use Western Medicine if necessary, as it is more important to me that my goats be well as opposed to being allied to any one medical practice. But, I will also add, that since treating my herd in a Natural & Holistic manner, they have never been healthier and happier. Also, please think about what you are administering and why (whether it be Western Medicine or Natural Medicine), do your research and use ALL medications responsibly.

Since I now practice mainly Holistic and herbal health care, I have not had the need to give a shot, of any type since, 2002. 

 

Since I don't use most Western Medicine drugs any longer, be aware that any information regarding Western Medical drugs have not really not been updated since 2002.

Types of shots/ the way that they are administered:

Intramuscular (IM)- Into the muscle.

Subcutaneous (SQ, sub-Q, SC) - Given under the skin.  Almost all shots for goats can be given SQ* (even if the label says IM) with the exception of hormones, such as Lutalyse.

*Due to the nature of how goats are put together by nature, and how they metabolize things, Sub-Q shots work just as good as IM in almost all cases.. The general reasons some shots are given IM and some Sub-Q is because IM gets into the system faster, this is due to the blood flow through the muscles. Sub-Q shots will get into the system slower because the blood flow through this area (under the skin) is slower. Goats have a high metabolism and not a huge amount of muscle mass. Because of this, shots given Sub-Q will get into the goat's system almost as fast as IM.

Why would your want to give shots Sub-Q as opposed to IM?  IM shots are usually more painful and can also cause tissle damage.  If you do not have to, why cause more pain, discomfort and stress than you have to? I care about my goats emotional health as well as physical health. I care if they are stressed. Part of holistic health care is keeping stress to a minimum. If I can give a shot with less pain, I will.

 

Important Note on Medication Dosages for Goats:

Goats metabolize medications differently than other animals; drugs clear their system faster.  As a result, goats require higher doses of drugs for effective treatment.  Most of the drugs available for use on livestock are not labeled for use in goats and so are not labeled with the correct dose for goats.  For a treatment to be effective, you need to use the correct dose. Please note that most of the doses given for goats on this site are "extra label" (Extra label means that the dosage given for goats differs from that found on the bottle and/or the Food and Drug Administration has not cleared their use in goats)

 

 

1 ml (milliliter) = 1 cc (cubic centimeter)
1 teaspoon = 5 ml (cc)
1 Tablespoon = 15 ml (3 teaspoons), 1/2oz
1 ounce = 30 ml (2 Tablespoons)

For more conversions, please see Measurements: Conversion Guides, Charts & Calculators

Rx = Vet prescription needed for this item.

Drugs / Medications
Page 1 (This page)

Herbs & Holistic Treatments
Molly's Herbals Web Site

Molly's Herbals is my other web site providing information on natural practices and the use of herbs, herbal formulas & natural supplements used in the holistic care of your dogs, cats, goats, horses, other pets & animals.

 

Epinephrine

Never give shots of any type without having epinephrine on hand!

Rx - Thanks to people making Meth, this is now to be found only by presciption (a real shame).

Anaphylactic Shock:
If the animal collapses within seconds or minutes of an injection this could be Anaphylactic Shock. You'll see it most often following an injection of a substance they've had before. Epinephrine (also known as adrenaline) must be administered immediately.

  • For treatment of: Anaphylactic Shock
    • If the animal collapses within seconds or minutes of an injection this could be Anaphylactic Shock. You'll see it most often following an injection of a substance they've had before. Epinephrine (also known as adrenaline) must be administered immediately.
  • Dose: IM Injection
    • 1 ml per 100 pounds
  • Notes:
    • We have never, in all our years of goat keeping, had to use this, but the $3 we pay for a new fresh bottle each year is well worth it for the insurance and peace of mind. It's always the one time you don't have it that you may need it. We would never be without it.
    • Did you see the movie Pulp Fiction? This is the shot they gave Uma Thurman.

 

Antibiotics

To calculate the weight of your dairy goat, please refer to our weight chart.

Always give the full course of antibiotics. Administer at least five days even if the symptoms disappear. Stopping antibiotics early often causes a recurrence, or allows the stronger bacteria to develop a resistance to the antibiotic. Continue to treat 24-36 hours after the animal is without symptoms.

Note on Antibiotics: I do not consider antibiotics the "be all, and end all, and cure all" of all medical treatments and I do not believe that giving antibiotics at the first sign of any illness is always the correct response. I get many posts from people asking advice with their goat's health and so often I hear "She had a runny nose, so I gave her antibiotics..." or "He couldn't stand, so I gave him antibiotics..." Antibiotics are used to treat infection and using them as the first response to any seeming health problem only breeds resistance to antibiotics, so when you actually do need the antibiotic for the reason it is intended, it may no longer work. Also, please be aware that antibiotics cause great stress to the Immune System and negatively effect the digestive system.
Please use antibiotics responsibly.

Drug Name:

Ceftiofur sodium- 1mg/ml - Rx

Brand Names:

  • Naxel
  • For treatment of:
    • This is a broad-spectrum antibiotic used primarily for respiratory illnesses such as pneumonia.
  • Goat dose: SQ Injection
    • 1ml per 50 lbs. twice daily
  • Milk withholding time: None
  • Notes:
    • Naxel is often used on conjunction with penicillin.
    • Naxel is expensive and has a very short shelf life of one week once the powder is reconstituted. It can be frozen for up to 8 weeks once the powder is reconstituted.
    • Naxcel may only be effective in the first days of the infection. Once past the first couple days it may be recommended to another antibiotic.

Drug Name:

Ceftiofur hydrochloride - Rx

Brand Names:

  • Excenel
    • For treatment of:
      • This is one of the new second generation penicillins; it's a broad-spectrum antibiotic used primarily for respiratory illnesses. It also controls the major pathogens involved with foot rot.
    • Goat dose: SQ Injection
      • 1ml per 25 lbs. once daily
    • Milk withholding time: None

Drug Name:

Oxytetracycline- 200 mg/ml

Brand Names:

  • LA-200
  • Oxy-Tet 200
  • Bio-Mycin 200
  • Liquamycin LA 200
  • Geomycin 200
  • Agrimycin 200
  • Maxim 200
  • For treatment of:
    • This is the preferred medication for the most the common causes of contagious keratoconjunctivitis ("pinkeye"), mycoplasma & chlamydia.
    • Used for metritis (uterine infection) following freshening.
    • Used for navel or joint ill in young kids (always treat joint/naval ill for a full 10 days).
    • Effective against most mastitis causing bacteria via systemic injection.
  • Goat dose: SQ Injection
    • 4.5ml per 100 lbs. every 36-48 hours. Administer 3 shots (one every 36-48 hours.)
      OR
    • 3ml per 100 lbs. once daily (this is the dosage I use)
    • For treatment of Pink Eye: administer a couple drops oxytetracycline directly into the eye as well as giving the injections.
  • Milk withholding time: 12- 18 days
  • Notes:
    • Do not confuse this drug with Tylan 200- it is NOT the same medication.
    • The label recommends a dose schedule of 72 hours, but blood levels become too low after 48 hours.
    • Oxytetracycline is counteracted by milk. Do not use in an animal that is nursing or has consumed milk, because it will not be effective.
    • Tetracycline, once the bottle has been used a while may become very dark (oxidizes), at which point the shot may painful, though still effective, when injected.
    • As it ages, tetracycline tend to be degraded and become toxic.
    • Do not use any tetracycline on pregnant does or kids under six months old because It may interfere with bone & teeth formation both in utero and while kids are growing.
    • Do not give Oxytetracycline and Penicillin at the same time. When given together, the tetracycline causes a chemical reaction that stops the effectiveness of Penicillin.
    • There is increasing resistance to oxytetracycline by many staph & strep organisms as well as strains of E.coli.
    • Often used in conjunction with sulfas drugs such as sulfadimethoxine (Albon)

Drug Name:

Procaine Penicillin G-
300,000 units Procaine Penicillin per ml

Brand Names:

  • Pfi-Pen
  • Agri-cillin
  • US Vet Penicillin G Procaine
  • For treatment of:
    • Penicillin is effective against gram-positive bacteria. Good for streptococcus infections, chronic pneumonia and other infections
  • Goat dose: SQ Injection
    • 1ml per 15 lbs. twice daily - Treat from 5-14 days, never less than 5. It should be used at least 5 days and until all symptoms have disappeared, whichever comes first.
  • Milk withholding time: 14- 20 days
  • Notes:
    • There is a widespread resistance to this drug.
    • Do not give Oxytetracycline and Penicillin at the same time. When given together, the tetracycline causes a chemical reaction that stops the effectiveness of Penicillin.

Drug Name:

Penicillin Procaine & Penicillin Benzathine combo-
150,00 penicillin units G procaine & 150,000 units penicillin benzathine per ml

"Long acting Penicillin"

Brand Names:

  • Twin Pen
  • Pen BP-48
  • Crystiben
  • US Vet Penicillin Benzathine & Penicillin G Procaine
  • For treatment of:
    • Penicillin is effective against gram-positive bacteria. Good for streptococcus infections, chronic pneumonia and other infections .
  • Goat dose: SQ Injection
    • 1 ml per 25 lbs. once a day -Treat from 5-14 days, never less than 5. It should be used at least 5 days and until all symptoms have disappeared, whichever comes first.
  • Milk withholding time: 25- 30 days
  • Notes:
    • There is widespread resistance to both penicillin procaine and benzathine, and studies have shown that the benzathine (long acting) form of penicillin has too slow an absorption time to reach recommended therapeutic levels.
    • Do not give Oxytetracycline and Penicillin at the same time. When given together, the tetracycline causes a chemical reaction that stops the effectiveness of Penicillin.

Drug Name:

Tylosin- 200 mg/ml

Brand Names:

  • Tylan 200
  • Tylosin 200mg Injection
  • For treatment of:
    • Effective against mycoplasma, chlamydia, rickettsia.
    • Used for upper respiratory infections and some forms of enteritis.
    • Used for mycoplasma arthritis in young kids
  • Goat dose: SQ Injection
    • 1 ml per 20 lbs. once a day for 5 days.
  • Milk withholding time: 8 days
  • Notes:
    • Tylan injections can very be painful. (we never use it for this reason)

Drug Name:

Florfenicol- 300mg/ml - Rx

Brand Names:

  • Nuflor
  • For treatment of:
    • Florfenicol has a broad spectrum of activity against both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria and is primarily bacteriostatic for salmonellae and E- coli.
  • Goat dose:
    • SQ Injection - 3ml per 50 lbs every 4 days
    • IM Injection - 3.5mL/100 lbs in the neck area every 2 days
  • Milk withholding time: 28 days
  • Notes:
    • Florfenicol can be a painful injection.
    • It may be ineffective unless used in the first days of the infection.

Drug Name:

Trimethoprim/Sulfaethoxazole - Rx
Trimethoprim/Sulfaiazine - Rx

Brand Names:

  • TMP/SDZ
  • TMP/SMX
  • TMP/SMZ
  • Tribrissen
  • Bactrim
  • Septra
  • Cotrim
  • Di-Trim
  • For treatment of:
    • A broad spectrum antibiotic and sulfa combination with a wide spectrum of activity against gram negative and positive organisms. For scours, pneumonia and misc. other infections.
  • Goat dose: Oral
    • 30mg/kg (665mg/50 pounds) twice daily.
    • One 960mg tablet per 70-75 pounds twice daily. (The most common tablets are 960mg.)
  • Milk withholding time: 8 days
  • Notes:
    • There is some question about the oral use of trimethoprim in ruminants. Some thoughts are that it may significantly degraded in the rumen.

Drug Name:

Cephapirin Sodium

Brand Names:

  • Today
  • Cefa-Lac
  • For treatment of:
    • Mastitis- For more info on treating Mastitis, click here.
  • Goat dose: Udder infusion
    • 4 or 5 infusions, 12 hrs. apart - milk out completely before infusing.
    • 2 or 3 infusions 24 hrs. apart (for less serious infections) - milk out completely before infusing.
  • Milk withholding time: 6 days
  • Notes:
    • You may accompany this treatment with SubQ oxytetracycline.
    • After treatment is completed, milk the doe out as often as possible.
    • For more info on treating Mastitis, click here.

Drug Name:

Cephapirin Sodium
(long acting)

Brand Names:

  • Tomorrow
  • Cefa-Dri
  • For treatment & prevention of:
    • Mastitis in dry does
  • Goat dose: Udder infusion
    • 1 tube infused into each side of udder. Do not milk again after infusion.
  • Notes:
    • This product will not make a doe dry up, it is only an antibiotic used to treat and prevent mastitis.

Natural/Herbal antibiotics see:

 

Antibacterials

To calculate the weight of your dairy goat, please refer to our weight chart.

Drug Name:

Sulfadimenthoxine

Brand Names:

  • Albon Concentrated Solution 12.5%
  • Albon Soluble Powder 107 gm pkg
  • Di-Methoox Concentrated Solution 12.5%
  • Di-Methoox Soluble Powder 107 gm pkg
  • For treatment of:
  • Goat dose:
    • Concentrated Solution 12.5% - Straight from the bottle; do not mix with water. Administer/Drench directly into mouth (do not dilute)
    • Soluble Powder mixed as follows: dissolve one package (107 grams) in three cups of water. Keep refrigerated. Administer/Drench directly into mouth

      Give Orally - Administer straight (no need to mix with any other liquids) into the mouth using a syringe (remove the needle). Do not just add it to the kid's water because you will not know if he receives the correct dose. Do not add it to his milk because the milk effects the potency of the drug.

        • Five day treatment- you must treat the full five days.
          • Day one: 1 ml per 5 pounds- given orally.
          • Days 2-5: 1 ml per 10 pounds- given orally
  • Coccidia prevention treatment:
    • Treat kids at three and six weeks of age.
    • Try to make sure that the kids don't poop, pee or walk in their food and water (virtually impossible).
  • Notes:
    • Albon is a broad spectrum antibacterial. It is also used to treat shipping fever, bacterial pneumonia, footrot & diphtheria.
    • This works the best for us in the treatment and prevention of Coccidiosis.
    • 5 packets soluble powder (107 gm) are equivalent to one gallon of Concentrated Drinking Water 12.5% solution

Drug Name:

Sulfamethazine sodium

Brand Names:

  • Sulmet Drinking Water Solution 12.5%
  • For treatment of:
  • Goat dose: Straight from the bottle; do not mix with water. Give Orally - Administer straight (no need to mix with any other liquids) into the mouth using a syringe (remove the needle). Do not just add it to the kid's water because you will not know if he receives the correct dose. Do not add it to his milk because the milk effects the potency of the drug.
    • Five day treatment- you must treat the full five days.
      • Day one: 1 ml per 5 pounds- given orally.
      • Days 2-5: 1 ml per 10 pounds- given orally
  • Coccidia prevention treatment:
    • Treat kids at three and six weeks of age.
    • Try to make sure that the kids don't poop, pee or walk in their food and water (virtually impossible).
  • Notes:
    • Albon is a broad spectrum antibacterial. It is also used to treat shipping fever, bacterial pneumonia, footrot & diphtheria.

Drug Name:

Amprollium

Brand Names:

  • CoRid
  • For treatment of:
  • Goat dose: Oral
    • As directed on label
  • Notes:
    • Sulfas (Albon or Sulmet) are a better choice for treatment of coccidiosis or severe coccidia problems.
    • I do not recommend using Corid, as I have not found it to be anywhere near as effective as Albon or Sulmet.

Natural/Herbal antibacterials see:

 

Pain killers

To calculate the weight of your dairy goat, please refer to our weight chart.

Drug Name:

Aspirin- 325 mg

 

 
  • For treatment of:
    • This is anti-inflammatory, that also reduces temperature and is a pain killer.
  • Goat dose: Oral
    • 1 regular aspirin per 10 pounds.
  • Milk withholding time: 24 hours
  • Notes:
    • Aspirin is poorly absorbed from the rumen so a relatively high dose is needed.

Drug Name:

Ibuprofen

 

 
  • For treatment of:
    • This is anti-inflammatory, that also reduces temperature and is a pain killer.
  • Goat dose: Oral
    • Double human dose
  • Milk withholding time: 24 hours

Drug Name:

Fluxixin Meglumine- 50mg/ml Rx

Brand Names:

  • Banamine
  • Cronyxin
  • Flumegluimine
  • For treatment of:
    • This is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory, that also reduces temperature and is a pain killer.
    • May be used in respiratory infections to combat attendant inflammation of the lungs (relieves coughing and dyspnea and areas of consolidation in the lungs).
  • Goat dose: SQ Injection
    • 1 ml per 100 lbs. once a day
  • Milk withholding time: 3-4 days
  • Notes:
    • Long term use is not recommended (possible ulcers, kidney problems).
    • We never give this more than three days in a row.

Natural/Herbal pain killer see:

 

To calculate the weight of your dairy goat, please refer to our weight chart.

Drug Name:

Selenium Tocopherol Rx
1mg of selenium and 68 IU of vitamin E per ml.

(for Selenium/E without a prescription and without having to give a shot, see Selenium-E Gel, below)

Brand Names:

  • Bo-Se- 1mg of selenium and 68 IU of vit. E per ml.
  • Myosel-B- 1mg of selenium and 68 IU of vit. E per ml.
  • MuSe- 5 mg of selenium and 68 IU of vit. E per ml.
  • Myosel-M-.5 mg of selenium and 68 IU of vit. E per ml.
  • Velenium - 5 mg of selenium and 68 IU of vit. E per ml.
  • For treatment of:
    • Use in prevention/treatment of Selenium deficiency can which and cause Nutritional Muscular Dystrophy, or White Muscle Disease. (weak legs in kids)
    • Also can increase fertility and also aids in easier birthing.
  • Goat dose: SQ Injection
    • Bo-Se/Myosel-B - 1ml per 40 pounds.
    • MuSe/Myosel-M/Velenium - 1ml per 200 pounds
  • Milk withholding time: 24 hours
  • Notes:
    • Selenium can be toxic, and the margin of safety is narrow. Use only in Selenium deficient areas (check with your vet)
    • Give pregnant does a shot of Bo-Se at 5 weeks and two weeks before their due dates. You can also give to bucks and does at the start of breeding season.
    • Kids born with weak legs are also given Bo-Se.

Drug Name:

Selenium-E Gel
1mg of selenium and 500 IU of vitamin E per 5 ml.

Brand:

  • Uckele Health & Nutrition
  • For treatment of:
    • Use in prevention/treatment of Selenium deficiency can which and cause Nutritional Muscular Dystrophy, or White Muscle Disease. (weak legs in kids)
    • Also can increase fertility and also aids in easier birthing.
  • Goat dose: Oral
    • adult goat - 5 ml (this provides the same amount of Selenium/E as 3 ml of Bo-Se)
  • Milk withholding time: none
  • Notes:
    • Selenium can be toxic, and the margin of safety is narrow. Use only in Selenium deficient areas (check with your vet)
    • We give pregnant does this product at 5 weeks and two weeks before their due dates. You can also give to bucks and does at the start of breeding season.
    • Kids born with weak legs are also given Bo-Se.
    • Currently, it's a little hard to find this gel. The best price I have found for it is from PBS Livestock Health. At this writing, Jeffers does not carry this product yet.

Drug Name:

Vitamins A & D
(injection)

 

 
  • For treatment of:
    • Vitamin A helps release Vitamin D, which makes calcium more available in the system.
  • Goat dose: SQ Injection
    • Check label for strength/doses.

Drug Name:

Vitamin B Complex
(injection)

 

 
  • For treatment of:
    • B Complex helps to soothe the intestinal linings, and stimulates the appetite.
    • For goats who are anemic from worms or stressed from illness.
  • Goat dose: SQ Injection or Oral
    • Check label for strength/doses.

Drug Name:

Vitamin B12 - Rx
(injection)

 

 
  • For treatment of:
    • Helps restore appetite.
    • For goats who are anemic from worms or stressed from illness.
  • Goat dose: SQ Injection
    • 1 cc per 100 lbs

Brand Name:

Red Cell

  • Vitamin & Mineral source.
  • Aids in the treatment of anemia.

Please note: We used to add Red Cell to our feed, but now, with all the health issues of diseases being passed because of use of animal products in animal feed, we have quit using Red Cell, which contains beef liver and died meat solubles. I no longer recommend using it.

Be aware that is illegal to feed any ruminate protein back to a ruminate as part of the scrapie/BSE control program.

Natural / Herbal Vit. & Mineral Supplement: Herbal Dietary Supplement

 

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The information on this web site is provided as an examples of how we do things here at Fias Co Farm. It is supplied for general reference and educational purposes only. This information does not represent the management practices or thinking of other goat breeders and/or the veterinary community. We are not veterinarians or doctors, and the information on this site is not intended to replace professional veterinary and/or medical advice. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat any health problems or illnesses without consulting your vet and/or doctor. We present the information and products on this site without guarantees, and we disclaim all liability in connection with the use of this information and/or products. The extra-label use of any medicine in a food producing animal is illegal without a prescription from a veterinarian.

The statements presented on this site regarding the use of herbs, herbal supplements and formulas have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The use of herbs for the prevention or cure of disease has not been approved by the FDA or USDA. We therefore make no claims to this effect. We do not claim to diagnose or cure any disease. The products referred to and/or offered on this web site are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. The information provided here is for educational purposes only. This does not constitute medical or professional advice. The information provided about herbs and the products on this site is not intended to promote any direct or implied health claims. Any person making the decision to act upon this information is responsible for investigating and understanding the effects of their own actions.