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Wormers for Goats

On this page I've listed all the wormers used for goats that I have information on, but that doesn't mean I use, or have experience with all these wormers. I have had quite a few people ask what I think of a particular wormer, or what I use on my own goats, so I include a personal notations for each wormer. I have also been asked what we use to worm our pregnant does. We choose to never worm any pregnant doe with a chemical wormer/drug. For pregnant does, we use an Herbal Wormer that contains no Wormwood on a weekly basis.

IMPORTANT, PLEASSE READ: The following information has been complied for general reference and educational purposes only, and is not intended as a means of diagnosing and treating an animal. It is not intended, in any way to replace professional veterinary advice or care for your goats. The information presented here is not a comprehensive review these drugs and their uses. I am not a vet, do not pretend to be one, and do not consider myself an expert on goat medicine. The following information was originally compiled my me, for my own use, from various sources (on-line, books, anecdotally, and person experience) that reported the successful use of the following on goats, in the amounts listed. I am sharing it with you for general reference and educational purposes only. This information is presented without any guarantee, and I disclaim all liability in connection with the use of this information. The administration of all medications should be taken extremely seriously. Veterinary consultation is vital when diagnosing and treating sick animals. It is your, and your vet's, responsibility to make proper decisions concerning treatments and drug safety or effectiveness for a given situation. Never disregard veterinary advice, or delay in seeking it, as a result of information provided on this site. Please note that most of the doses given on this site are "extra label" (Extra label means that the dosage given for goats differs from that found on the bottle and/or the Food and Drug Administration has not cleared their use in goats). Extra-label use of any product in a food producing animal is illegal without a prescription from a veterinarian; that includes the milk withdrawal information.

Note on absence of meat withhold information: We are vegetarian, and not raise or sell goats for meat or meat related purposes. My site is for everyone, and I try to have it be thorough, but I do not gather information specific to killing goats, and so, I do not have it to share. The information on this page was originally compiled for my own use; I have no personal need for meat withhold times so I never collected it. The medications listed below probably do have meat withhold times; if you are looking for meat withdrawal information, you will have to research elsewhere.

 

DO NOT underdose wormers. In most cases (but not all), it is better to give too much than not enough. Please note that the dosages for goats is sometimes much more than what it says on the label, if you underdose, you are wasting the wormer and helping the worms to build up resistance.

Always weigh your goat before administering any wormer and make sure to give the correct does for the weight of the goat. To calculate the weight of your dairy goat, please refer to our weight chart.

People get confused about "rotating" wormers. If you give a different wormer every time you worm, this builds up a resistance to all your wormers very quickly. It is best to stick with one wormer until it is no longer effective, or you could use the same wormer for at least a year, and then the next year use a different one.

Notes about chemical wormers:

  • The way these work is that they are essentially poisons. What you are doing is poisoning the parasites in order to kill them. When you are using a chemical wormer, you are administering enough poison to kill the parasite but (hopefully) not enough to kill the host (in this case, your goat). Because of this, be especially careful when worming sick animals, because their resistance is already weakened due to their illness.
  • Not all chemical wormers are safe to give to pregnant animals.
  • The use of chemical wormers is contrary and counterproductive to holistic health care.

When to worm when using chemical wormers:

  • When necessary, but try not to overworm.  Fecal testing is the best way to determine when to worm chemically.  If you do not test, you might want to worm every two months or more often if needed.
  • Always worm a new goat the day they come onto your farm since you have no idea of what kind of care they received before coming to your farm..
  • ALWAYS WORM A DOE THE DAY AFTER SHE KIDS. You do this because the stress of kidding lowers her resources making her more susceptible worms and also, the hormones released at kidding can "arouse" dormant parasites that may be in her system.
  • If you see "rice" in the goats poops (these are tapeworms).
  • If the goat seems thinner than she should be.

Notes about herbal wormers:

  • Molly's Herbals Worm Formula (the wormer that I designed and formulated) works holistically in multiple ways.
    • By expelling live worms: the worms hate being around the herb so much they would rather leave the host than be around the herb.  Because of this, you may see worms in the animal's poops after they have been wormed.
    • By killing and expelling the parasites.
    • By helping the animal build a stronger immune system so they can more easily fight an infestation.
    • Working as a preventive: By helping the animal build a stronger immune system so that they can resist the parasite and thus not become infected in the first place.  Healthy animals are much less likely to get infected than unhealthy ones. 
    • There has been no evidence to show that worms build up resistance to this herbal system like they can do with Chemical and Drug wormers.
    • Molly's Herbals Worm Formula is a two part system and is safe to administer to pregnant animals.
  • What about other herbal wormers?  I really can't speak about them specifically because I didn't formulate them.   Here are a few general notes:
    • They may or may not be designed to work in the above mentioned ways. 
    • Many herbal wormers and worm products contain laxative herbs such as Psyllium. The idea behind using laxatives is to flush out parasites by loosening stool and stimulating bowel movement. However, I believe this approach adds stress to the animal's system and may lead to laxative dependency.
    • Many herbal wormers contain Wormwood and should not be given to pregnant animals.

When to worm when using herbal wormers:

  • Every week on a continuing bases.  Do not discontinue in the Winter.
  • Extra herb may be giving if the situation warrants it.
  • Always worm a new goat the day they come onto your farm since you have no idea of what kind of care they received before coming to your farm.
  • Always worm a doe the after a she kids.  You do this because the stress of kidding lowers her resources making her more susceptible worms and also, the hormones released at kidding can "arouse" dormant parasites that may be in her system.

Symptoms of worms:

  • pale (or white) gums
  • dull coat
  • diarrhea
  • lower milk production
  • clumpy stools
  • off feed
  • fluffed hair
  • listlessness
  • subnormal or slightly elevated temperature
  • rumen failure
  • dehydration
  • chronic coughing (lung worms)- dry cough, especially after running or other exercise.
  • "bottle jaw" (severe infestation)- swelling under the jaw.

We do not worm pregnant does with chemical wormers unless absolutely necessary. If it is necessary, we use Ivomec, since this is proven safe for pregnant does.

 

You can run your own fecal samples (or have your vet do them), to really know when to properly worm your herd, and what wormers to use. This way you worm only when it is really necessary, which not only helps worms not build resistance, but also saves time and money.

How worms build resistance:

Worms can build resistance to the Chemical wormers. Usually this happens because the wormer being used, is used over a long period of time and at improper dosages. The amount of wormer used is not enough to kill all the worms, but enough to help many of them build resistance. Also, over a long period of time, using the same chemical wormer, there are bound to be "strong" worms that survive the worming, these guys for, some reason, have built a resistance to that particular wormer and pass this on to their offspring (survival of the fittest). So, if a chemical wormer is used for over a long period of time, there is bound to be resistance. How long a period is totally dependant on the particular situation and management practices.

Goats have worms. It's a fact. There is no shame in this for the breeder. It's the amount of worms that is the issue. A healthy animal can resist a worm infestation because his system resources are strong and fight the worms and the worms cannot get a foothold. It is when the animal is poorly managed, or under some sort of stress (which contributes to illness and dis-ease) that the worms get a foothold and cause an infestation.

This is where herbal remedies differ from chemical ones. Herbs work with the body, to build and strengthen system resources, and so the body is strong and can resist and fight dis-ease. Herbal wormers not only expel worms, but they also strengthen the body so that worms cannot get a foothold.

How old the animals are when they are brought to your property really does not make a difference to the worms or their resistance, even if you have never had animals on your property before. Even a 1 month old kid is going to be carrying worms of some sort and these worms came from somewhere. It is good practice to worm all animals immediately when they are brought onto your property, so as to reduce the worms that they are bound to shed and let loose on your property. As a practice of "polite management", I always worm every animal I sell the day they are to leave my farm to go to their new home.

 

Wormers Used on Goats

Chemical Wormers:

Important Note on Chemical Wormer Dosages for Goats:

Goats metabolize wormers differently than other animals; drugs clear their system faster.  As a result, goats require higher doses of wormers for effective treatment.  Most of the wormers available for use on livestock are not labeled for use in goats and so are not labeled with the correct dose for goats.  For a treatment to be effective, you need to use the correct dose. Please note that most of the doses given for goats on this site are "extra label" (Extra label means that the dosage given for goats differs from that found on the bottle and/or the Food and Drug Administration has not cleared their use in goats)

Please be aware that my information on chemical wormers below is starting to get a bit old; it was compiled many years ago. I no longer use chemical wormers on my own herd so I don't really "keep up" with any new wormers that may arise.

Natural / Herbal Wormers:

To calculate the weight of your dairy goat, please refer to this weight chart.

Brand Names:

  • Ivomec Injectable for Cattle & Swine 1% Sterile Solution (Merck)
  • Double Impact Injectable for Cattle & Swine 1% Sterile Solution (Agrilabs) 

Drug Name:

ivermectin

  • Family: Avermectin
  • Treatment & Control of: Lungworms, gastrointestinal roundworms, larvae, lice, mange mites & cattle grubs. External parasites.
  • Goat dose: Oral
    • 1 ml per 50 pounds- given orally.
    • Some people are now using 1cc per 34 lbs with good success. This is 3X the label dose.
  • Milk withholding time:
    • In the US: 36 days
    • In the UK: 14 days
    • My personal withholding time: 4 days
      • Why is my personal withdraw so much shorter? Ivomec is used on humans in third world countries. The withdrawal times given on the package is set by the FDA after testing on cows (the use of Ivomec in goats is "extra label"- it has not been tested on goats) and it is said that after the regulated number of days there are no traces at all of drug left in the (cow) milk. You can see the in the UK, where the drug has been tested on goats, the withdrawal is shorter than in the US. Here on our farm, the milk I milk from our goats is consumed by only two people, me and my husband (both adults). I personally am not concerned about the very small traces of wormer that may be in the milk after four days, since I know the wormer is safe to use on humans anyway. This why my person withdrawal is four days. I drank this 4 day withdrawal milk for many years with no ill effect until I switch the using my Herbal Worm Formula. It is up to you to make your own choice about how long you decide to withhold the milk.
  • Notes:
    • This injectable wormer is not given by injection. It works much better if given orally. Measure the wormer with a syringe, but remove the needle before squirting the wormer into the goats mouth. Get it as far back as you can because it does not taste good and they will try to spit it out.
    • This wormer does not kill tapeworms. If you actually see worms in the goats poops, use Valbazen or Safeguard.
    • Safe for use in pregnant does.
    • This wormer is used in third world countries in humans.
    • Do too it's overuse, there is beginning to be resistance to this wormer in the US, Thailand and perhaps other countries.
    • I used to use this wormer quite often, before I switched to Herbal Wormer. This is the wormer I used most often when and if I chose a chemical wormer.

Brand Names:

  • Dectomax - injectable & pour-on

Drug Name:

doramectin 1% injectable
doramectin 0.5% pour-on

  • Family: Avermectin
  • Treatment & Control of: Lungworms, gastrointestinal roundworms, larvae, lice, mange mites & cattle grubs. External parasites.
  • Goat dose: Oral
    • Pour-On: 1 ml per 10 lbs. given orally
    • Injectable: 1 ml per 35 lbs. given orally
  • Milk withholding time: 36 days
  • Notes:
    • I have no personal experience with this wormer or it's use.

Brand Names:

  • Eprinex

Drug Name:

eprinomectin 5mg

  • Family: Avermectin
  • Treatment & Control of: Lungworms, gastrointestinal roundworms, larvae, lice, mange mites & cattle grubs. External parasites.
  • Goat dose: Pour-On
    • 1 ml per 10 lbs
  • Milk withholding time: None
  • Notes:
    • I have no personal experience with this wormer or it's use.

Brand Names:

  • Valbazen Cattle & Sheep Dewormer Suspension (Pfizer)

Drug Name:

albendazole 11.36%

  • Family: Benzimidazole
  • Treatment & Control of: Lungworms, gastrointestinal roundworms, stomach worms, tapeworms, intestinal worms & liver flukes (adult).
  • Goat dose: Oral
    • 1 ml per 10 pounds- given orally.
  • Milk withholding time:
    • In the US: 5 days
    • In the UK: none
  • Notes:
    • Tape worms are the only worm you can actually see in the goats poop without the aid of a microscope, if you actually see worms in the goats poops, this would be a good time to try Valbazen.
    • DO NOT give this wormer to pregnant does during the first 45 days of pregnancy. (I don't give Valbazen at all during any stage of pregnancy. Since there are other good wormers that are safe throughout pregnancy, I see no reason to "risk it" by give Valbazen at all at this time.)
    • 75 mg/kg fatal.
    • Do too it's overuse, there is beginning to be resistance to this wormer in the US, Thailand and perhaps other countries.

Brand Names:

  • Safeguard
  • Panacur

Drug Name:

fenbendazole

  • Family: Benzimidazole
  • Treatment & Control of: Lungworms, gastrointestinal roundworms, stomach worms, tapeworms, intestinal worms, bankrup worms & nodular worms, liver flukes (adult).
  • Goat dose: Oral
    • If using the horse or cattle version of this wormer give 4 times the recommended dose for horses/cattle- given orally* (see the notes below for more explanation of how to figure the dose)
    • To treat for tapeworms, you need to give the above treatment three days in a row.
    • There is now a version of this specifically for goats, I haven't used this (it is the same chemical as the horse version) , so I would say to use the doss on the label.
  • Milk withholding time:
    • In the US: 4 days
    • In the UK: none
  • Notes:
    • Safe for use in pregnant does.
    • There is a wide resistance to this wormer. We no longer use it here because it has totally ceased to have any effect in this area (North Eastern TN). The last time I used this wormer for my herd I administered a 4X dose to all my goats for three days in a row and repeated this 10 days later and saw NO effect on the parasite population whatsoever.
    • IMPORTANT: I have received more and more email from people all over the US and in Thailand telling me they continue to have worm problems even though they worm with Safeguard. It is turning out that this wormer is NO LONGER EFFECTIVE in many parts of the US and Thailand (and maybe in more places). Based on personal experience and also the information I am receiving from other people, I strongly suggest that you do not rely on this to be an effective wormer any longer. Do not waste your money, or risk your goat's health- choose a different wormer.

*How to figure the dose using the tube horse wormer with the dial: The dose for this wormer is 4X the horse dose, by weight. The dial on this wormer is marked out by weight, in pound increments. So...if your goat weighs 100 pounds, you pretend she weighs 400 pounds... this is a 4X dose, and you adjust the dial to about 400 pounds. If your goat weights 50 pounds, you turn the dial to roughly 200 pounds. This is a very safe wormer, and you cannot over dose it, so don't worry about giving too much; it is better to give too much, than too little.

To calculate the weight of your dairy goat, please refer to this weight chart.

Brand Names:

  • Tramisole
  • Levasol

Drug Name:

levamisole

  • Family: Imidothiazole
  • Treatment & Control of: Lungworms, roundworms.
  • Goat dose:
    • Injection: Tramisol injectable 13.65% is given SQ at the rate of 2ml/100lbs.
    • Oral: The oral sheep oblets: 2 tablets/100 lbs.
  • Milk withholding time: 4 days
  • Notes:
    • Levamisole is very effective against lung worms.
    • Safe in pregnant animals.
    • There has been reported toxicity with this wormer if overdosed, so be sure to weigh your goats and administer the correct amount for each animal. Do not overdose.
    • Do to the possibility of death if over dosed, I personally avoid using this wormer if at all possible.

Brand Names:

  • Cydectin
  • Quest Equine Wormer  

Drug Name:

moxidectin

  • Family: Milbymycin
  • Treatment & Control of: Lungworms, gastrointestinal roundworms, larvae, lice, mange mites & cattle grubs. Extrenal parasites.
  • Goat dose: Oral
    • Cydectin- given orally 1cc per 20-25 lbs.
    • Quest Equine Wormer - Is 4 times stronger per ml. than Cydectin. I am unsure of the dose for this particular product for goats (the dose would be different than stated on the label.
  • Milk withholding time: none
  • Notes:
    • Avoid getting this on your skin.
    • Do not overdose this wormer. There are some questions as to whether this is, or is not, safe for use in pregnant does. This may be related to overdosing. I avoid using this in pregnant does.
    • Do not use topically; use orally. I have heard of some health problems, and even deaths, reported when this wormer was used on goats as a pour-on.
    • I have used this and it worked well, but since this wormer was designed to be used topically, as a pour-on, I am concerned about the carrier (it smells like wart remover). Since I do not want to risk my goat's health, I do not use this wormer.

Brand Names:

  • Synanthic
  • Benzelmin (horse)

Drug Name:

oxfendazole

  • Family: Benzimidazole
  • Treatment & Control of: Lungworms, stomach worms: barberpole worms, small stomach worms, brown stomach worms; intestinal worms; nodular worms, hookworms, small intestinal worms, and tapeworms.
  • Goat dose: Oral
    • 2x - 3x the label dosage
    • To treat for tapeworms, you need to give the above treatment three days in a row.
  • Milk withholding time:
  • Notes:
    • Do not use in pregnant animals
    • I had a bad tapeworm problem in our kids one year (befire switching to herbal wormer) and this was the only wormer that cleared it up (I tried Safeguard and Valbazen first and they were not effective).

To calculate the weight of your dairy goat, please refer to this weight chart.

You can run your own fecal samples (click here)

Wormers - Herbal Wormers

Click here to read an interesting article comparing herbal wormers to a chemical wormer.

Molly's Herbals Original Worm Formula System

  • Formula #1 Wormwood Combination
  • Formula #2 Herbal Weekly Worm Formula & Tonic

Click here for more information and purchase info

After much research into herbal wormers and wormer compounds for goats, dogs, cats, horses and other animals, I have found that most of the herbal wormer products available on the market today indicate that they should be used weekly, and are safe for pregnant and lactating animals. These formulas all contain Wormwood, which is not considered safe, by Herbalists, for use while pregnant and not recommended for use while breast feeding. Since herbs are not drugs, herbal wormers and worm formulas do not legally have to carry milk withdrawal information or pregnancy warnings. Since some other herbal wormers and worm formulas say they are safe, they are either: taking advantage of this loop whole; they are either mistaken as to the safety of Wormwood (perhaps thinking that all herbs are safe in all situations); or these formulas contain so little Wormwood that they will not be effective for the use they are intended. Wormwood is a herb, and not a drug, and it has not been officially studied by the FDA to discover if there is should be a milk withdrawal time or whether it is safe for pregnant animals. Because of this, you can say there is no official safely issue, but research into the use of herbs will show you it should not be use on pregnant humans, or animals.

Wormwood is effective and safe when used properly. The continuous, long term use of small doses of wormwood, (exactly as how some wormers prescribe it) can be harmful to your animal's kidneys, liver and nervous system. Wormwood can be used safely on animals in larger doses, on an occasional basis (every 6-8 weeks). Because of this I have created, for my own herd, a system using two herbal worm formulas that work in conjunction with each other: the Herbal Wormwood Worm Combination and the Herbal Weekly Worm Formula & Tonic.

Most herbal worm products also contain laxative herbs; my formulas do not. The idea behind using laxatives is to flush out parasites by loosening stool and stimulating bowel movement. However, this approach adds stress to the animal's system and may lead to laxative dependency. If constipation is associated with a worm infestation (which very rarely happens) you could administer Slippery Elm, which aids in lubricating the digestive tract without pulling needed fluids from the body.

Please note that this type of wormer is used in a Holistic manner. Holistic therapies address the health of the entire animal (or human) by slowly and surely balancing the systems of the body, strengthening the immune system, and preventing disease. Because of this, you need to understand that herbal wormers are used as a preventative, as opposed to just waiting until you have a major problem or infestation. Please read this: Understanding using herbs.

  • Ingredients:
    • Formula #1 Wormwood Worm Combination: Molly's special blend of Wormwood, Garlic, Fennel, Black Walnut (horse formula does not contain black walnut), plus Stevia to increase palatability.
    • Formula #2 Weekly Worm Formula & Tonic: Molly's special blend of Cucurbita Pepo, Mugwort, Garlic, Fennel, Hyssop, Thyme, plus Stevia to increase palatability.
  • Dosage:
    • Formula #1 Wormwood Worm Combination: Administer once a day for three days in a row, repeat every 8 weeks. For more information, click here.
    • Formula #2 Weekly Worm Formula & Tonic: Administer once a day, once a week on the weeks you do not give the Formula #1. For more information, click here.
    • Kids under 2 months: 1/2 Tbsp
    • Mature goats: 1 Tbsp.
  • How to administer: Either mix with the animal's daily grain ration; make into "dosage balls" and feed; or or mix with enough water so you can it pull up into a syringe and drench (squirt it down their throat).
  • Milk withholding time for Formula #1 Wormwood Worm Combination: None...
    BUT take note... Because this is an herb mixture and not a drug, it has not been studied by the FDA and can legally be labeled as having no milk withholding time/withdrawal. BUT since Formula #1 contains Wormwood (see the Safety Note below), and Wormwood is not recommended by many Herbalists for breast feeding humans, you may decided that if you are feeding the milk to very young human infants (under 6 months of age or so), just to be absolutely "safe and sure ", to withhold the wormwood milk from the infant for 24 hours. The milk is perfectly safe for older human children and adults, as it is for the offspring of the lactating animal. If you decide to withhold, just save enough milk to last the infant child an extra day and use the 24 hour withdrawal milk for your own drinking or to make cheese. It's not like you have to throw it out.
  • Milk withholding time for Formula #2 Weekly Worm Formula & Tonic: None
  • Safey Notes:
    • Used as directed, this combination system is safe for all pregnant and lactating animals. (The Wormwood Combination is not given to pregnant does)
      • Formula #1 Wormwood Combination Safety Notes:
        • Since this is an herb mixture and not a drug, it can legally be labeled as safe to use in animals when pregnant (which is what most other herbal wormers) BUT since this formula contains Wormwood, which is an "Emmenagogue" (An emmenagogue is an herb which encourages menstrual bleeding, and so it could induce loss of uterine lining which may cause miscarriage.) it is not considered safe by Herbalists for use in pregnant humans or animals. I recommend not give to pregnant animals. If you are using another herbal worm product, read the label or find out what is in it before you buy it, and if it contains Wormwood, you should take this into consideration. You should use Formula #1 right before breeding and then start using it again the day after the animal gives birth.
        • The chemical name for the principle active ingredient in wormwood is thujone. Thujone is a monoterpene (type of primary alcohol found in plant matter) that is often attributed with having a hallucinogenic effect. The liquor Absinthe, the popular in the 19th century, known for its mind-altering effects, is made with Wormwood. Wormwood is not recommended for breastfeeding mothers because thujone might be passed to the baby in the mothers milk, though this has not been studied.
        • Excessive amounts of wormwood can be damaging to the liver, kidneys, and nervous system.  Do not use in animals who suffer from seizures, kidney problems, or liver disease.
        • Wormwood Worm Combination contains some Black Walnut. Black Walnut is safe for most animals, but horses should not consume it because horses can have an adverse reaction to a certain mold that sometimes grows on the hulls of the black walnut. If you intend to use this formula for horses, please check the horses box when you place an order and I will mix a special formula that does not contain Black Walnut.
        • Black Walnut, if ingested in excessive amounts, in dogs and cats, may lead to diarrhea and gastritis
      • Formula #2 Weekly Worm Formula & Tonic: Safe for all pregnant and lactating animals

Hoegger's Worm Compound for Goats

"An aid to Discourage Worms"

  • Ingredients: Wormwood, Gentian, Fennel, Psyllium, Quassia
  • Dosage: Administer twice a day for three days in a row, then once a week.
    • Kids 2 months or older: 1/4 tsp. 1/2 tsp
    • Mature goats: 1 - 1 1/2 tsp.
  • Milk withholding time: Labeled as no milk withdrawal. but take note... Because this is an herb mixture and not a drug, it has not been studied by the FDA and can legally be labeled as having no milk withholding time/withdrawal. BUT since this compound contains Wormwood, and Wormwood is not recommended by many Herbalists for breast feeding humans, you may decided that if you are feeding the milk to very young human infants (under 6 months of age or so), just to be absolutely "safe and sure ", to withhold the wormwood milk from the infant for 24 hours. Milk is safe for older human children and adults.
  • Notes:
    • Pregnancy note: This is label as safe to use during pregnancy, but because this in not a drug, it can be legally labeled as safe to use during pregnancy. Their instructions say this is safe, but since this formula contains Wormwood, which is not considered safe for use in pregnant humans and animals; do not give to pregnant animals. Wormwood is an "Emmenagogue" (An emmenagogue is an herb which encourages menstrual bleeding, and so it could induce loss of uterine lining which may cause miscarriage.)
    • The continuous, long term use of small doses of wormwood, can be harmful to your animal's kidneys, liver and nervous system.
    • Excessive amounts of wormwood can be damaging to the liver, kidneys, and nervous system.  Do not use in animals who suffer from seizures, kidney problems, or liver disease.
    • I used this wormer before developing my own and found it fairly effective, but because of the Wormwood and my worries regarding it's use as prescribed by this wormer, I formulated my own wormer system, which I now use exclusively.

Diatomaceous Earth (DE)

 

  • For treatment of: External parasites.
  • Goat dose: Dust on goat and around barn. Do not breath in dust; Inhaling it can cause lung problems
  • Milk withholding time: none

What is is and How Does it work?:

DE is a kills parasites by mechanical means. It is not a poison.

DE isn't dirt or earth, is made up of the fossilized skeletons of siliceous marine and fresh water organisms, particularly diatoms. These skeletons are made of hydrated amorphous silica or opal. When crushed, they break up into tiny pieces of "glass'' (so tiny that the material feels like talcum powder). This is easily picked up by the hairy bodies of most Insects. Whereupon it scratches through their protective wax layer. The result being that the insects lose water rapidly, dry up and die.

Natural diatomaceous earth (DE for short) is the remains of microscopic one-celled plants (phytoplankton) called diatoms that lived in the oceans that once covered the western part of the United States and other parts of the world. Huge deposits were left behind when the water receded. When crushed, they break up into tiny pieces of "glass'' with razor sharp edges (so tiny that the material feels like talcum powder). This is easily picked up by the hairy bodies of most Insects. When DE comes contact with the insects, the sharp edges lacerate the bugs' waxy exoskeleton and then the powdery DE absorbs the body fluids causing death from dehydration. Said more simply, DE kills insects by drying then up.

  • Notes:
    • Diatomaceous earth is very dusty and can cause lung problems if breathed heavily, so when applying it dry always wear a good dust mask or stand up wind.
    • Whereas with a contact pesticide (poison), the insect dies quite quickly, with DE control may take several days.
    • The DE sold for swimming pool filters is ineffective for insect control because it has been heated and chemically treated. It won't kill insects and it is very dangerous to breathe. Make sure to use "food grade" or "garden grade" DE.
    • Natural DE will kill beneficial insects too, so use it sparingly to kill problem infestations of harmful insects and don't use it too often.
    • Some people say you can use this for internal parasite control. My own experiments showed that it was not an effective control. DE works by mechanical means to dry out the parasites and insects it kills. Internal parasites (worms) cannot dry out inside an animal, because it's surrounding (inside the animal) are always moist and warm.
    • I have read information from others that their goats health actually degraded when they fed DE in an attempted to worm their goats and then improved when they ceased to use it.
    • I, personally, would never use this as a wormer since there are more effective natural choices.

 

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Web Site Designed and Maintained by Molly Nolte (aka. Molly Smith)

Copyright (c) 1997-2012 Molly Nolte. All rights reserved.
All text written by Molly Nolte (aka Molly Smith) unless otherwise noted.

All graphics, photos and text on these pages were created by, and are the sole property of, Molly Nolte.
Individuals are granted the right to download a single copy of this page for archival purposes on electronic media and/or conversion into a single printed copy for personal use.

All other use or reproduction of this material, such as in publications or use on other web sites is strictly prohibited.  It may not otherwise be reprinted or recopied, in whole or in part, in any form or medium, without expressed written permission.

This site may be used as a reference (but not copied and/or plagiarized) if proper credit is provided and a web link is given.

The information on this web site is provided as an examples of how we do things here at Fias Co Farm. It is supplied for general reference and educational purposes only. This information does not represent the management practices or thinking of other goat breeders and/or the veterinary community. We are not veterinarians or doctors, and the information on this site is not intended to replace professional veterinary and/or medical advice. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat any health problems or illnesses without consulting your vet and/or doctor. We present the information and products on this site without guarantees, and we disclaim all liability in connection with the use of this information and/or products. The extra-label use of any medicine in a food producing animal is illegal without a prescription from a veterinarian.

The statements presented on this site regarding the use of herbs, herbal supplements and formulas have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The use of herbs for the prevention or cure of disease has not been approved by the FDA or USDA. We therefore make no claims to this effect. We do not claim to diagnose or cure any disease. The products referred to and/or offered on this web site are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. The information provided here is for educational purposes only. This does not constitute medical or professional advice. The information provided about herbs and the products on this site is not intended to promote any direct or implied health claims. Any person making the decision to act upon this information is responsible for investigating and understanding the effects of their own actions.