Homemade Carbonated Water

carbonator

Homemade Carbonated Water

Seltzer / Sparkling Water / Homemade Soda Pop

Save money, and the environment, by making your own carbonated water at home. After the initial investment (less than the cost of a Soda Stream), you can make your own carbonated beverages for less than $0.05 (5 cents) a bottle.

 

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Do-it-yourself Home Carbonator

 

Parts

(You can get these all from Amazon and/or various local and on-line brewing supply places ):

  • Aluminum CO2 tank (Any size will do, I use a 5 pound tank because that is what I had on hand)
  • Single gauge CO2 regulator with check valve (You can use a double gauge if that is what you have)
  • 3 feet of thick plastic hose or beverage tubing: 1/4″ interior diameter X 1/2″ outside diameter
  • 2 hose clamps
  • Carbonator Cap by Liquid Bread
  • Disconnect, IN (gas) Ball Lock, 1/4″ MFL
  • Teflon tape
  • Empty 2 liter pop bottle
The Check Valve is the little red lever at the bottom left of the above photo.

Directions

Refer to the photos above. Connect the hose to the Regulator at one end and the Disconnect at the other end with the hose clamps. Use the Teflon tape to seal the threaded connections.

IMPORTANT: Make sure you set your carbonator up so that the tank is secure and can’t be knocked over.

Set the regulator to 40 psi.

 

 

Screw the Carbonator Cap onto a not quite full 2 liter pop bottle (see photo, I fill right to wear the bottle’s shoulders start to narrow). Make sure the water is very cold. The colder the liquid, the better the carbonation. (I actually put the filled bottle in the freezer for 1/2 hour).
Squeeze out the extra air and tighten the Cap.
Connect the Disconnect to the Carbonator Cap.
Once you’re certain everything fits tightly with no leaks, open the valve on the top of the tank and then open the check valve slowly, You might be startled by the CO2 quickly entering the bottle. The bottle will get very hard. Don’t worry, the bottle can withstand the pressure.
Turn the bottle horizontally and shake the bottle vigorously like you are making a martini for a 20-30 seconds. It’s all about exposing as much surface area of cold water to the CO2 as possible.

Close the check valve and, release the Cap from the Disconnect. You now have your own home-made seltzer.

 

Open the bottle with care! :-)

 

Tips and ideas:

  • I like my seltzer with a slice of lemon and lime.
  • I sometimes top-off the bottle off with juice to make a nice flavored water (grapefruit is my favorite)
  • Note that cold water carbonates best, but you can carbonate other things with success as long as it’s cold..
  • You can get actual coke product flavorings “Bag in a Box” at places like Sam’s club or GFS and make real coke in your home. You can even use the syrups from Soda Stream. Adjust the amount of syrup to suit your own taste.
  • The Cap will fit on small pop bottles as well, so you can easily recarbonate flat soda-pop.
  • Carbonate apple juice, Hawaiian punch and Kool-aid
  • Carbonate box wine to make cheap “Champagne” (just make sure the wine is cold)

 

Homemade Mineral Water!

Here’s a simple recipe
Add to the water before you carbonate it

  • 1/4 tsp. magnesium sulfate (epsom salts)
  • 1/4 tsp. calcium chloride (Ball Pickle Crisp granules)
I’m working at other simple recipes now. If you want to get real technical, check out htis page:

 

7 thoughts on “Homemade Carbonated Water

  1. Jesus, wouldn’t it be easier to buy soda stream? . But great job

    By your thinking, it’d be easiest to go buy the water from the store.

    Soda Stream is pretty expensive at around $0.25/liter, not including the hardware.

  2. The refill CO2 containers for the soda stream are between 32 and 45 dollars on amason. Each one is SUPPOSED to be good for 60 liters.

    I will assume the container is actually good for 60 litters (likely a generous estimation). I will assume the CO2 containers can be purchased consistently online for $40 (base+shipping+tax). You’d be looking at $0.67-%0.75 per liter. This does not include the initial cost of the SodaStream. You can ofter find 2 liter bottles of carbonated water at Safeway for less than $1.

    How much does it usually cost to fill up a 5lb CO2 tank? I’m seriously considering the option laid out on this site?

    Thanks

  3. I just learned that you can refill the SodaStream CO2 containers for about $15. Still it seems a lot more reasonable to just purchase one 5-10lb CO2 tank.

  4. So Jesus’ estimate was closer to the real cost.

    BTW, it was only after actually looking at the user names that I noticed Jesus’ clever joke. Thanks for making my night, Jesus :P

  5. The refill CO2 containers for the soda stream are between 32 and 45 dollars on amason. Each one is SUPPOSED to be good for 60 liters.

    I will assume the container is actually good for 60 litters (likely a generous estimation). I will assume the CO2 containers can be purchased consistently online for $40 (base+shipping+tax). You’d be looking at $0.67-%0.75 per liter. This does not include the initial cost of the SodaStream. You can ofter find 2 liter bottles of carbonated water at Safeway for less than $1.

    How much does it usually cost to fill up a 5lb CO2 tank? I’m seriously considering the option laid out on this site?

    Thanks

    I think I paid $15 to refill my tank at the local fish store. I’ve only had to refill it once since setting it up. I make at least 2 liters of carbonated water a day, sometimes 4.

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