Goldie – Queen of Goats

Goldie Head

Preface:

When I originally began to write this stream of consciousness essay, there was no way I could have foreseen the events that were to unfold in the next 24 hours. I had my laptop with me most of the time and for some reason I felt compelled to write whatever come into my head as the events were happening. It is only now, three months later, that I am able to go back to what I wrote, add a preface, epilogue and photos to present it for others to read.

October 18, 2006

Imagine your favorite pet: the one you loved the most of all, of any animal you have ever had bless your life. Recall the love you have, or had, for them. Often we love an animal, with his/her unconditional love, unlike any human we have ever loved; this is the love of which I am referring. Now imagine this pet as a major part of your life, influencing all aspects of how you have lived, and even make a living, for the last 11 years. Now imagine this wonderful creature being more than an animal, imagine she be like your best human friend and your foster child. If you can image these things, you may come close to understanding the feelings I have for Goldie, the most wonderful goat you could ever have the pleasure to know.

Resting in the sun
Goldie resting in the son with her triplets – 2002

Today is a warm day in the middle of October and I have just returned from the barn.

Goldie is old now.

Today, she cannot walk on her own; her front knee “went out” on her again yesterday and if she takes a step she falls. Larry and I just moved her out onto the grass in the sun, which is not as depressing as being in a stall. She can’t get up on her own, so we help her up. She will stand for a little while and then, if she tried to take a step, she’ll fall. I help her into a comfortable position. She resigned. She is a smart old gal. She reaches out her head and nibbles some grass. I pet her and tell her I love her and hold back tears because I know she is nearing her end. It is not fair to this wonderful, strong, loving Queen to live a life like this: a depressed life of frustration & pain. She has lost so much weight, though she’s still about 150 pounds, but that is nothing like the 215 she was just one year ago.. She stopped eating grain and began loosing weight when her feet got bad this Spring. She has always had bad feet, but in her old age, an infection set in in her rear feet which made walking painful. I’d lovingly wash, and carefully trim her feet and treat her in every way I knew how, but healing takes longer when you’re old. She shifted her way of standing, putting all her weight on her front legs and since getting up and down with her arthritis was hard, she would stand all through the night. Now her ‘good’ front knees keep going out on her. It’s just like with a human getting old, things start to go, and one thing leads to another. I know itï’s the way of life: we all get old and eventually die. It’s just so very hard to see it coming. To see Goldie will not be with us much longer. Its tearing me up.

We all must go eventually. I’ve seen my share of death. It’s never easy; it’s always hard, and harder when you truly love the one who’s passed. I’m a Healer. I help people, and their animals, all over the world. I have saved many a life, and comforted many a grieving human at the lost of their love one. Still, this makes it no easier for me. I know a lot about helping the sick, but I can’t cure old age. We have to accept the inevitable. But, it still doesn’t make it any easier. I know the pain of loss; the indescribable grief, and knowing this doesn’t make all this any easier. The lucky thing for animals is that we can help them pass from this life, when this life has no quality worth living to it. We can’t do that for humans, so it is nice we can give this gift to out animals friends. And this, I an afraid, is a decision we are going to have to make for Goldie soon. It’s tearing me up.

And so I must write about her…

Even though it was 11 years ago, I remember the first time I saw Goldie like it was yesterday.

It was in October of 1995. We wanted to get a milk goat, and had gone to a goat show in Knoxville. We didnï’t know a lot about goats then. We were looking for a doe to purchase but had about as much money as knowledge at that time (next to none). Most of the does we saw that were even for sale (there were not many) were out of our league in terms of cost. We looked up and down the aisles and were about done, with no luck at finding a doe and in almost the very last stall was a plain little blond doe stand up and looking at us and screaming her head off. “Meeeeeeeeeeeeeee!!!!!ï” She yelled to me. I went to her and touched her and looked up and saw the sign “For Sale”. I looked at Larry and asked,”What about her”. We decided to wait to ask about her. The person who owned these goats was busy showing her goats so we waited ½ hour. Anytime we’d walk away the little doe would scream to us to come “baaaaack”.  She really wanted us to take her home. Finally the woman came and we asked about the doe. She was not an American or Purebred, she was a mixed breed and was $75. I would have paid $100, which to me was a lot of money at the time.

The doe did not belong to the woman but was being sold for by her for a friend. We paid for the little doe, who’s name was Goldie. As we walked her out of the goat area she pooped and her poops were loaded with white things. A breeder who was near by looked and said, “She’s full of worms”, and gave us a look like we were complete rubes, which maybe we were, but I already loved this little doe and so we drove her home. On the way home we stopped at a farm supply store to buy a wormer for Goldie and when I went in the store, Goldie yell for me to come back the entire time.

And so Goldie was seven months old when she joined our then, motley goat herd, which consisted of a little buck named GoatBoy, a wether named Smiley and wild little doe named Little Girl. We first put Goldie and Smiley together in a stall for the night and the next day, GoatBoy was in there with them as well. I had to leave the very next day to go to WV and it’s amusing, when I spoke with Larry on the phone after I had gotten to WV he said, “That doe is the ugliest goat I’ve ever seen”.  She was a LaMancha doe with little tiny”elf ears”. I fell in love with her personality so quickly that we didn’t even really notice her odd looks and tiny ears.

bruins
Goldie’s first kids “the Bruins” – 1996

Goldie was bred by GoatBoy in the Fall of her first year and presented us with extraordinary twin does in Late Winter in 1996. I remember it was 20* that night she had her first kids. Buffalo Gal and Burrita were brown and black and were identical twins except for one big difference: one had elf ears and one had long Alpine like ears. It was ridiculous, but that was Goldie.

Goldie, Trouble and Blondie
Goldie feeding her daughters Trouble and Blondie – 1997

The next year (her second) when she went into labor she was having trouble delivering. The first time in my life I had ever seen anything born was our first year of goats (the year before), now here it was our second year of having kids. We had never seen anyone assist a birth before and all we knew was from the few books we studied. I ran up to the house to try to find a vet to come help. After ½ hour I could reach no one who could come. Frantically I ran back down to the barn. I was quite attached to Goldie at this point and the though of loosing her was horrible. I entered the barn and found Larry, Goldie and two little babies. Larry told me the story and once again, Goldie proved herself remarkable.

Goldie could not deliver the kids; she needed assistance. I was up at the house. Larry knew he had to “go in” and even with no experience he knew he had to do what he had to do. Goldie stood, with no one holding her. She was not tethered or tied. She just stood and let Larry do what he had to do as best her could. Larry managed to get the kid positioned right and then out come Trouble (so named because of the trouble she caused her birth) and after Trouble came Blondie.

And, of course, Goldie was a great mom and wonderful milker..

eating a mater
Eating a ‘mater

In 1999, came her first set of triplets and something else remarkable. Goldie, who was always a lower member of the herd challenged the current queen, a big bitchy Nubian named Belle. We were present at the battle and a battle it was. Ouch!  If you have never seen or heard goats seriously knocking heads, you can’t imagine the force they pound each other with. In the end, Goldie won the battle and thus became Queen. She was a good and benevolent queen as well, and reigned until the Summer of 2006.

Getting walked over
A mother you can walk all over – 2000

Assorted Fond Memories of Goldie:

~Goldie was a great mom and loved her babies. Not only that, she was kind to other kids as well. A sight I will always hold fondly in my memory was when one day we came down to the barn and there was Goldie laying on the soft bedding under a large hay rack. Around her, nestled around her I counted 9 kids. She looked up at us with a real smile on her face as if to say “Look at all the babies I have”.  She was truly happy with her brood. Only three of the kids were actually her’s, but they were all safe and warm gathered around the Herd Queen.

~When my friend Pete came for a visit, I let Pete have a go at milking Goldie, and she was as good as gold and extremely patient with Pete as he attempted to milk her. She never fidgeted or raise her foot; she was very understanding of his inexperience. Afterward, as she was want to do at that time of her life, she bullied him just a little. She could sense his lack of goat experience, and being 200 pounds, she was seeing what she could get away with. It’s only natural, to make sure the new herd member knew his place. Later on we took a walk. The rest of the herd had moved on, and Goldie stayed back with us, as she often did. She always knew humans were the ones to stick around. You never know what we were going to do. She had been pushing Pete a bit, but as we got to some quite steep land, she moved on ahead single file. Then Pete slipped, he fell and Goldie immediately turned around and hurried back to him to see that he was ok.   She was truly concerned about him, and let Pete steady himself on her. After that she didn’t push him, but stayed near to make sure he was steady and ok.

~Goldie had a strong neck and could swing her head around with some force. She always knew where to swing her head and hit men right in the balls. I always though it pretty funny. We often had to warn male visitors of a possible surprise strike.

Goldie resting after kidding
Goldie resting her head on her new daughter, Quan Yin, after a difficult delivery. – 2002

Yes indeed Goldie is a very special, one-of a kind goat: She’s smart, loves people, loves to be milked, and loves her children. She knows her name as well as understand other words such as “no” and she comprehends what we might want her to do. Most of the time I really feel we understand each other on a level that is hard to explain. She is always easy to work with. These days, we’ve been using a sling to aid in moving her around. Larry on one side and me on the other, holding her up. It didn’t take long for her to figure out what was what with us and the sling and she’ll start “walking” as we bare her weight- she let’s us know where she wants to go.

We’ve been hoisting her up in her sling to get her weight off her feet and so that I can work on her feet. Again, she understands the drill, and puts up bravely with her treatment.  Afterwords I always give her a couple corn chips as a treat, which she appreciates.

We decided that 2004 would be Goldie’s last year of having kids. She would be 9 years old which, we felt, was a good age to retire. With her not-so-great feet and tendency to have multiple kids, as well as needing occasional assistance with kidding, we decided not to put her through the strain anymore. We promised Goldie that with this last kidding, she could keep a girl to stay with her for the rest of her life. We also let her breed Ulysses, whom she has always loved.

The first day of Spring, 2004, we knew she was closed to kidding so right after morning barn chores, I decided to run to town for groceries so I could be back to be with her that afternoon (when we though she would kid). I went to town and when I returned Larry was not at the house. I turned on the barn video monitor to see if Larry was at the barn and I saw him, Goldie and kids. Larry said hurry down to the barn. When I got to the barn, Larry was standing in the center isle and smiling. I looked into Goldie’s stall and there she was standing there happy and proud as can be with FOUR babies!

Larry told me how he was working in the barn and Goldie came over to him as if to say “it’s time”. She went to the kidding stall door and said “let me in, it’s time to have my babies”. Larry told me how the birth went fine and he had already gotten everything all cleaned up when Goldie revealed her surprise. She had already delivered triplets, and Larry figured that was it. We had never had a goat have more than 3 babies and so it never occurred to us that Goldie had another kid left in her. Larry was all cleaned up and ready to head to the house when Goldie started to push to deliver the fourth kid. It was twisted and Larry had to “go in” to straighten it out.

Larry kept saying (jokingly) “Four babies? Goldie, what were you thinking?”

Goldie�s Quads
Goldie stands proudly with her quads, here just a couple hours old. – 2004

There is another story I have written about the female of the four, Goldie Jr , which you can read here.

When Goldie’s last daughter, Goldie Jr. was an adult, we came down to the barn in the morning and found that Goldie Jr. had her head stuck down low in a stall wall. She had been trying to get at some hay that had fallen from the hay rack in the stall next door and managed to get her head stuck. She was pretty pregnant a the time and was laying on the ground looking a bit uncomfortable, Now, normally this could have been a dangerous situation because a stuck goat could easily be the target of pot-shots from other goats, but Goldie Jr. was safe. Standing above her, guarding her, resting her head on Goldie J’s back was Goldie. She stood all night protecting her daughter.

Goldie and Sadie
Goldie resting with her daughter Sadie – 2000

I spent this afternoon writing about Goldie. She spent the afternoon in the sun. We just returned where we helped her back to her night stall. She knows the drill. She can’t stand up on her own, but see us with the sling and trying to get up enough for us to get the sling under her. Together we muscle her up and she “walks” to her stall, with us supporting her weight. It’s an ordeal, but we are will to do if for her. Put stand her in front of the hay rack and give her a couple of chips. We pet her and tell her we love her. I’m not sure how long this can go on. She’s a great gal; she lived a great life. She will always reside in my heart and mind.

I love you Goldie.

October 19, 2006

This morning when we went down to the barn we found Goldie sprawled out and moaning. She could not right herself. We got her in a comfortable position and I held her so she would not roll over.

In my arms, as I wept and told her how much I loved her, she went to sleep. She told me she was so very tired and wanted just to sleep. We thought when this time came the decision would be so hard, but in reality it is not our decision at all; it is hers. We will make the necessary arrangements today. She deserves to rest and pass from this life with dignity. I already miss her so very much.

Later
How could I have guessed, when I started writing this yesterday that today would be like this?

I’m stunned and numb. 1/2 hour ago I was holding Goldie in my arms. She was resting her head on my chest and I lay my head on hers. She was comfortable and calm in my arms. I was crying. Now, she is gone and I wait in the barn for the cremation person to come take her away. Goldie was strong, and it took longer than I though it would for her to pass from this life. But now she is at peace at she can move on to the next life.
Still Later

Now I’m back at the house. It’s 11:45 am. It all happened so fast. We went down to the barn at 8:00 am. Less then four hours later there is a huge hole in our herd and in my heart that can never be refilled. She’s really gone now. We’re suppose to get the ashes back this afternoon. I have her collar draped over my neck. In the barn, when I put it there, it was still warm, but now it is getting cold. I’m just so stunned and sad. I’m sad because I don’t want her not to be in my life anymore, but, it would not have been fair to her to make her stay. It was time. She was a great lady, a great Queen; the matriarch for our herd. She was the foundation of our herd and so could be considered the center of my life for the last 11 years. Thank you Goldie. Thank you for being a part of my life and giving life to our herd.

Born: March 11, 1995
Died: October 19, 2006

Her legacy will continue on….

Goldie gave birth to 22 children in 9 years:
1996: Buffalo Gal Bruin, Burrita Bruin
1997: Blondie, Trouble ‘A Bruin
1998: Sparkin Spartacus
1999: Sadie O’Grady, Yosh, Stan
2000: Nilla Puddn’, Willie
2001: Niblets, Walden
2002: Joyce, Harvey, Quan Yin
2003: Martini, Rossi, Rob Roy
2004: Lane, Shane, Zane, Goldie Jr.

~Molly Bunton, October 19, 2006

Epilogue:

We spread Goldie’s ashes on a Oct. 21, 2006, two days after her passing. I could not let her physically go before that. It was an incredibly beautiful day. The light was wonderful and had a golden cast to it. I took photos in celebration of Goldie that morning which you can see here. We spread her ashes where she always liked to lay, and watch me garden and the herd graze. I took photos when we spread the ashes as well. Her ashes got all over my hands and the ashes in turn got all over my camera. I thought it was fitting. Goldie will always be with me when I take photos.

I miss Goldie so very much.
She was a wonderful friend, and the most extraordinary animal I will ever have the honor to have known. There will never be another like her.

Fallen Leaf

Goldie’s ashes dusting a Fall leaf – 10/21/2006

145 thoughts on “Goldie – Queen of Goats

  1. This is the most beautiful thing I think i have ever read. I feel your pain, I too have a doe who I know her time is close, it is soo sad and I wish she can stay with me forever, but like you said, it is not fair for them. I am sorry for your loss and Goldie is definently priceless!

  2. Dustin Lamanen says:

    I have a pygme goat ready to kid any day. This is my first time ever having any goats. I hope everything goes good.

    Sincerely,
    Dustin

  3. Dustin Lamanen says:

    I love your set up and I hope to get one just like it some day.

  4. Nadia says:

    That was one of the saddest tales I red about a farm. Goldie was a good goat. I felt the same way when my cat died.

  5. Angela Tidwell says:

    I’m so sorry for your loss, I know it feels like you’ve lost a member of your family, and of course she is.

  6. Karla Lancaster says:

    I am so sad after reading Goldie’s story.
    I have an older goat named LaRita and she is awesome. I don’t look forward to going threw loosing her. Hope you have peace now. I believe Goldie does.
    Blessings to you and your family.

  7. Pam Beuder says:

    I smiled and cried when I read Goldie’s story. I can tell that spending the time you had with Goldie was a great gift. That is what I try to remember most when I think about the animal family members that are no longer with me. Goldie is leaping and playing in a lovely meadow now. God bless.

  8. Alex Cripps says:

    Hi I started out with goats a few years ago and now i have a good sized herd if Nubians and Boer (with a Alpine/Saanen doe) And found your web-site the year i got your goats and seen how old she was and thogut she was she a great goat. I loved her just as l love all your goats even tho i have never met you or your goats. I found it so hard to read that she passed away and i felt as if i raised her and kept her thats how your web-site made me feel i to have a doe that is only 4 years but has a large udder and love her to death she was my first nubian and still think about how im never going to get over it. I hope some day that me and my wife will show our own baby to my beth. But i have to say keep up posting and writing im sure there are many others like me. And max was such a doe!!! I wished you could send me some pictures! Of her now!! Thanks for all the help.
    Alex Cripps
    Hazy Day Nubians
    http://www.hazydaynubians.piczo.com
    Canada

  9. My heart goes out to you. I know what you speak of as my girl “Flower” is like your Goldie. She is a special animal that is more human than any people I have ever know. She’s a beautiful black LaMancha that we begged for! She too begged at 3 days old to have us take her home.

    She’s still young, only 15 months, and pregnant for the first time. She’s already miscarried once. I had her at UC Davis last week and I was crying like a baby that something could take her away.

    I hope I can be as caring as you when the time does come, for her sake. Right now I can not IMAGINE life without her.

    God Bless!

  10. Molly says:

    Thank you everyone for your comments. I really appreciate them so much. It was very difficult for me to get this story up to share with others because I would cry every time I tried to work on it. I am glad I can finally share with you.

    Alex:
    Sadly Max passed away from an unexpected heart attack this summer. And we lost Uly to old age as well. It has been a difficult year for out herd, but this is the problem when you have a herd for a long time and goats start to get old. sadly the cold hard fact of life is death.

  11. Debbie says:

    Molly,
    I sit here with tears running down my face, I have just read your story about Goldie. A beautiful story. I lost my first goat Babby freddy a little over a year ago,he was the friendliest,most loving goat I’ve ever known ,still to this day every time I go to the barn I think of him. I still miss him very much. He will always hold a special place in my heart as I’m sure Goldie has a special place in yours. I want to thank you for sharing your story .I touched me in so many ways. Maybe your Goldie and my Babby Freddy are friends in there other life.
    Debbie

  12. Molly says:

    Thank you Debbie. I am sure Babby Freddie and Goldie would get along great and be best friends.

    Goldie Jr. kidded on Feb. 11th and she is so happy with her new little family: a boy and girl. She really missed her mommy and was all alone in the world after loosing her. Now she has babies of her own, and little Sunbeam to keep with her and brighten her life again.

  13. Kristen Stevens says:

    This is a beautiful story that has touched my heart to the point I started crying. I only have three dairy goats, 2 Nubians and 1 Lamancha but I am so attached them all, I don’t know what I would do if I lost them. This will be Stormy’s (2 year old Nubian) second kidding, she made so much milk for me up to 3 quarts a day. She only made her milk for me. If I left her for a day and my parents milked her for me she would make only 20 ounces!!! Your website has helped me in many ways and I want to thank you.

    Kristen Stevens

  14. Pam Peacock says:

    Molly,

    Your Goldie was so lucky to have you as her mom….That is one of the most touching stories I have read in a long time…You gave her a good quality of life and there is no doubt that she would not have lived as long as she did with out you…..It is always hard to say goodbye and death seems so final…I am sure Goldie is in a much better place now with no more pain although we are the ones left behind with only our memories to hold onto….Godie will always be a part of you and live forever in your heart…I found your story very touching to my soul and although I never met Goldie I feel I know her some how through your words of your memorial tribute to honor her life on this earth…God Bless you and I will keep you in my thoughts and prayers…Pam in Oregon

  15. teri says:

    Hello
    I had just read your story of Goldie.
    I am so sorry for you, she was special.
    My husband and I are going to buy our first goat this year.
    I hope ours will be like yours a special family.
    Thank you for the life story of Goldie.

    Teri

  16. Lesserweevil says:

    I read on your website when you lost Goldie. It was nice yet sad to read the story of her that I saw just now. A beautiful story.

  17. RuthAnn Henderson says:

    Molly,
    I read about a life of a simple goat that became such a wonderful part of your life.i bought two goats last year along with there babies,It soon became the most wonderfull thing that has ever happend to me and now three year old daughter,The happieness that i recieved from this no eared goat and her big mouth still bring the biggerst smile on my face,and the healthy milk she gave my daughter soon had her gaining weight and being able to eat more foods.I have no idea what i am doing this year as i waite for babies to come.Your information you give on this websit i so wonderfull,it better then the goat books i have.Thank you for taking your time to help others.
    with much thanks RuthAnn

  18. Trish Cawley says:

    What a lovely story Im bawling like baby and my nose is running what an honour it is for you to have been associated and loved by this glorious creature Im looking at getting my first goat which I hope i will have half the pleasures you had with Goldie and how lucky you are that you can see her in many eyes all around your farm

  19. Missy says:

    I loved Goldie’s story. I went through the same thing with my dog, Shy. I have a horse with a special personality also.
    Your site has been so helpful to me and my children. We have always wanted goats and now we have a small herd of 12 and growing.
    Have you ever thought about publishing your info? I would love to have a book to keep and I’m sure other people would too.
    Missy

  20. Lisa Benes says:

    That was such a touching story regarding Goldie. We are just now starting our goat farm. I bought “Momma” who had twins last October and she is a wonderful milker for my first try. I will let yuo know how it goes this fall when I breed my females. Thanks for all your help along the way. Lisa

  21. Valeria says:

    Hello,
    My five goats are showing signs of labor and one is going first (we can tell)she has refused all her kids in the past but I hope she can be as good a mother as Goldie. Your website has helped us so much. I just wanted to say thank you and that I am so sorry for your loss.Goldie seemed like a wonderful goat. Rest In Peace.

  22. Colleen Gallagher says:

    Molly,
    I have two does that seem to mean as much to me as goldie meant to you. One of them is at the point where she is no longer able to stand with any weight on her left back leg. She is a wonderful momma and last week gave birth to her first set of triplets ! She has her own room and does not have to put up with any shinannigans from the rest of the herd. It is going to break my heart when the time comes. Thank you very very much for sharing your experience, as painful as it is. I have to go get another box of tissues as I am still crying. Colleen and the Wickkid Wind Herd

  23. michelle says:

    I am so sorry to hear about Goldie. I am pretty new to the goat world and I have been coming to your site since last year when I got my first dairy goats. I read about Goldie then and was sad to hear about her now.

  24. Rose Banks says:

    Hi Molly,

    I just now read your touching story about your Queen goat Goldie. I am so sorry for your loss. I had always seen Goldie’s picture on your website, but I was so shocked this time to see that it was a memorial picture.
    Goat Heaven’s herd is growing; we lost our Billy just over a month ago to CAE. The herbs I gave him from your website had bought him at least 6 more months of a good quality of life. But this disease, like time, is unstoppable, and eventually it falls to us to release
    them from rhis life when the time has clearly come.

    There can be no greater tribute to Goldie than to share
    your great love of these wonderful animals thru your
    freely shared knowledge on your site and the wonderful products you provide, so that we can all help our own beloved animal companions.

    Peace and comfort,

    Rose.

  25. Mary Ellen Cota says:

    Hi, I live outside of Rochester NY and grew up in a tiny town at the top of the state where there are many farms. When I was in second grade my Daddy bought me a lamb to raise. I had a blast with that little ram that grew to be huge. We had a big house and about an acre of land that we raised a big garden on and a sheep, several rabbits and chickens at different times. That was years ago. I am in my 50s now and having discovered that I am allergic to cows milk recently, I have discovered raw fresh goat milk that I get from a small farm about an hour away. How I wish I was still in the house I grew up in so I had room to raise a few goats. When I go to get milk from Lilac, I hate to leave her and her two new kids, one female white girl and a brown billy. So cute! I always go to the state fair and have to visit the sheep and goats. I always said I thought goats had awesome personalities. Now that I need their milk I am finding out I am falling in love with them. I am really close to saying I have to have some goats. I am loving NY less and less because of the taxes and the ridiculous restrictions on choices of foods you can buy raw, etc etc and etc. I could easily see myself settling in the mts of NC or VA where it isn’t so hot, and just buying a very small farm to put a few goats and a couple of dogs on. My husband is 63 and it might be difficult to persuade him, but ya only live once, right? Though I would have absolutely no clue as to what the heck to do with a goat except love them and enjoy their milk, etc. Gosh, I wish I could pick your brain for days. Thanks so much for putting up this great site. Mary Ellen Cota

  26. Kate says:

    Goldie’s story moved me to tears, for I have just recently lost my beloved Maggie. Their stories are so similar, it’s uncanny. Goldie was a wonderful gal. My deepest sympathy to you.

  27. Ray Meinberg says:

    A beautiful and touching story! Goldie was as fortunate as you were, to have had such a big-hearted mom and friend. Our oldest goat is only seven, just middle-aged really, and in very robust health but I know I will outlive the herd and there is a part of me that tries very hard to pretent it isn’t so, that I will always have the comfort of my reliable and loving caprine family.
    Last year I had to have my Sabrina, my truly faithful canine companion put to sleep after sixteen years. I didn’t think it possible to have felt the sort of overwhelming grief that generated; I haven’t been hit that hard emotionally since losing team mates, men among whom there was a warrior’s brotherly love, in a dark green country a long time ago. I take consolation in knowing Sabrina was adored and looked after right to the last moments; it took three shots to put her down;she was strong of heart, a fighter to the end. I believe you can draw the same solice.
    There is a marvelous poem called RAINBOW BRIDGE; I don’t have the room for it here but you can Google it easily. In my deepest heart, I know it’s true.
    You have some really beautiful boys n’ girls. Show them the same care & love you showed Goldie & it will help you move on.
    Best Regards, Ma’am,
    Ray & Kathy
    Tahara Farms / Sheeba Goat Dairy

  28. Deb Burk says:

    Hey Molly,
    Was just visiting your site to get some information on scours and babies and was so sad to see that your beloved Goldie had passed. Of course I had to find out what happened…I loved reading about her! She was “some goat”! Unconditional love from a critter is the most incredible feeling in the world and the heart breaks ever so deeply when they are gone! Love to you and your herd and thank you for sharing your life and knowledge so openly with all of us!
    Deb Burk
    GoTees Farm
    Dresden, ME

  29. Roxie Bare says:

    Molly,
    Your story of Glodie touched my heart and made me cry. I have my little herd of goats and I feel about Sadie the Queen of my herd, as you do Goldie. I do not look forward to the time that Sadie passes from this world. As she is only 3 1/2 yrs old, I expect many years with her yet.

    I have other goats that I love as well, but none so special as Sadie..my first goat.

    Thank you or sharing your story.

  30. Sarah T says:

    I feel for you greatly about losing Goldie. I just went through a similar experience. My husband bought me a baby billy for our anniversary. I had him 2 years when he got the meningiel worm. Even though he had been wormed faithfully the vet said that it doe sometimes happen. I was devistated when he couldn’t get up anymore and I had to have him put down. This goat was like a pet dog. Didn’t need a fence. As long as I was around he was happy. I know that Goldie and him are resting very peacefully. I’m sure they are roaming the clear blue sky together.

  31. Leigh Rogers says:

    Molly,
    You may recognize my email address since we have just recently corresponded in the last couple of days. I am further expanding my knowlege of your website and while I have seen the picture of Goldie every time I look, I have not had the courage to read the story. So….yeah I’m sitting here crying after reading the story because I feel the same way about my goats and I guess my “Goldie” is named Vanessa although I do adore all of them. I have seven so far. Vanessa is about 18 months, so she is still quite young, but we have been through some pretty serious trials together.
    I am very happy to see how many people look at your website and care about goats. They are the best!
    Thank you for the story of Goldie and everything else on the website.
    Leigh

  32. i love your goats and your goat molly looks just like one we have called momma-do she came to me and my husband with one kid all skin and bones , her feet were so over grown she could hardly walk being of the heart for we both are there was always room for one more she never has to be fenced on our 300 Ackers of land all we have to do is call and she always comes on the run with the rest of our goats. the best thing about her is she may only have one set of twins a year but she is the mother to many . after her kids are two months old she will take any other new born just like it was her own … with her around we always have a wet nurse on the farm .

  33. Deb Wishart says:

    It was heart warming and heart breaking to read your journey through life and death with Goldie. It is obvious she blessed your life as you blessed hers with love and respect. The inability to stop the aging, illness, pain… and saying goodbye is the sad part… I share your loss and tears. I also have known the love of extraordinary animals and can vouch that decades do not keep memories of those special friends from suddenly “popping” into your mind…like they are still with us…

  34. Tina M Aden says:

    Silence……..just all choaked up and sitting here in silence…………so beautiful a story. Thank you for sharing this wonderful part of your life with us.

    PS Your site has saved lives for us and we thank you from the bottom of our hearts,
    Tina M Aden
    Aden Farms

  35. Cathy Muthler says:

    I read your story while endlessly searching for info to help my two wethers of 11yrs..They are not doing well,and I`ve exhausted the few vet possibilities. I lost my favorite a few yrs. ago…I was lying under a horse blanket with him,to help get his body temp. up ,when he died.Needless, to say, I cried with your story as if I had known Goldie…Thankfully,they live on in our hearts…..Take care…..

  36. Tina McCubbin says:

    What A beutiful storie I could feel how much you loved Goldie. I am crying for you right now. What a WONDERFUL TRIBUTE. I enjoyed the pictures of her with her babies. She is young and happy somewhere now!!

  37. cathy says:

    i read your story, and cried, as last night my saanen died, 6 weeks ago she gave birth to triplets all by herself, and was a wonderful mum, and the kids are all strong, she started to look ill earlier this week, i called the vet, but she said that she had no serious symptoms, just plain exhaustion from 3 demanding babies. her death was totally unexpected, and i now have to wait 2 days for her body to be removed, which is distressing for the kids to see. i am also worried about them, they are eating solids, but should i be offering them bottled milk? i am not experienced in this situation. i have 3 other goats, they are pygmy’s, the female one, molly has taken to mothering the babies. the other female is 1 yr old and blind, i hand raised her. the other is a male, and he has escaped to the farm next door, i think the death has upset him.

  38. Rena says:

    oh my gosh i really feel bad about goldie. I have just bought a 6 year old girl for my 11 month buck. i have already attached to Heidi. Crash my buck i have had since 4 months and have spoiled him CRAZY , not even a year yet and i will be saddened like crazy when i loose the both of them. I feel your pain and am truely soory for your loss of goldie. She is in a happy place thinking of her bestest friend of her happy years, Molly
    I am sorry

  39. Greg says:

    I also miss Goldie now, thank you for sharing your story!
    Greg

  40. Donna says:

    I just read you storie about Goldie, I cryed and laugh at some of the stories.
    It just touched my heart, Goats are a very loving animals. I have one High Pockets and she is a nubin doe my husband bought he at the auction and brought he home and said come out side and see what i bought you, So I did and when our eyes made contact i fell in love with her.. I dont even know how old she is, But it doesnt matter when Goat heaven calls her home I will miss her.
    Donna

  41. Patti Phelps says:

    We recently became an owner of 8 goats, and then Mr. Bob came to visit and now we have 24 goats. This has been an incredible, wonderful, frustrating, happy experience for me.

    I never knew that goats needed so much attention! My gosh, I had my hand in as far as it would go helping one of my mama goats give birth. I am the type of person that cannot stand to get her hands dirty. That has all changed.

    My goats are so lovable, thoughtless, caring and special. All they want is affection, and hugs (food, and more food!) What a motley crew I have, each with their own warm personality.

    I was told not to name any of them if I was not going to keep all of them. There is no way I can detach from these gorgeous animals. I have named a few, and they are so special. My goats sure like to talk, and talk, and talk,……. What creatures. How blessed I am to have the pleasure of owning a goat herd. They have brought me frustration, love and warmth to my soul. If I need a hug, all I have to do is go outside in the field and here comes my pals to say hello, scratch my ears, hug me, or just sit down with us.

    I recently went to a horse race in southern Oregon. I had to bring one of the goats with me because she was the frail one. What a character “Red Eye” was. She walked along beside me and my two border collies. People would look and remark , “is that a goat or a dog?” She went to the beach with us and down to the park. I think Red Eye thought she was part of the dog family. I will never forget that trip with her.

    One night not too long ago, Red Eye was having difficulty with sucking her bottle, and I got as much down her as possible, and then we curled up on the couch and she slept under the blankets with me the whole night. Now if that isn’t just too cool.

    Happy goating.

  42. Patti Phelps says:

    We recently became an owner of 8 goats, and then Mr. Bob came to visit and now we have 24 goats. This has been an incredible, wonderful, frustrating, happy experience for me.

    I never knew that goats needed so much attention! My gosh, I had my hand in as far as it would go helping one of my mama goats give birth. I am the type of person that cannot stand to get her hands dirty. That has all changed.

    My goats are so lovable, thoughtless, caring and special. All they want is affection, and hugs (food, and more food!) What a motley crew I have, each with their own warm personality.

    I was told not to name any of them if I was not going to keep all of them. There is no way I can detach from these gorgeous animals. I have named a few, and they are so special. My goats sure like to talk, and talk, and talk,……. What creatures. How blessed I am to have the pleasure of owning a goat herd. They have brought me frustration, love and warmth to my soul. If I need a hug, all I have to do is go outside in the field and here comes my pals to say hello, scratch my ears, hug me, or just sit down with us.

    I recently went to a horse race in southern Oregon. I had to bring one of the goats with me because she was the frail one. What a character “Red Eye” was. She walked along beside me and my two border collies. People would look and remark , “is that a goat or a dog?” She went to the beach with us and down to the park. I think Red Eye thought she was part of the dog family. I will never forget that trip with her.

    One night not too long ago, Red Eye was having difficulty with sucking her bottle, and I got as much down her as possible, and then we curled up on the couch and she slept under the blankets with me the whole night. Now if that isn’t just too cool.

    Your story about Goldie is so touching, and what a special triubute to her. I can feel her love and affection she had for you and your family.

    Goats have a specialness about them. People think that I am crazy because I love my goats so much. My grandchildren simply love the goats. They like to sleep outside with them in the field. Imagine waking up early in the morning and having 14 baby goats walking all over you. It was a magic moment.

    Happy goating

  43. Jill Weible says:

    Thank you for sharing your story so beautifully and gracefully… What a gift Goldie was to you- and I know your tribute to her life is absolutely touching to all and any of us who have ever had the blessing of a special animal friend. She had a gift in you as well, thank goodness for selfless people such as yourself. Thank you also for softening my heart today and making me pause and reflect on the special friends and moments that although sometimes almost ubearingly painful, give this lifes journey depth and texture and make living worth living afterall.

  44. Jill Weible says:

    Thank you for sharing your story so beautifully and gracefully… What a gift Goldie was to you- and I know your tribute to her life is absolutely touching to all and any of us who have ever had the blessing of a special animal friend. She had a gift in you as well, thank goodness for selfless people such as yourself. Thank you also for softening my heart today and making me pause and reflect on the special friends and moments that although sometimes almost unbearingly painful, give this lifes journey depth and texture and make living worth living afterall.

  45. Jill Weible says:

    Thank you for sharing your story so beautifully and gracefully… thank goodness for selfless people such as yourself. Thank you for sharing her life and making me pause and reflect on the special friends and moments that although sometimes almost unbearingly painful, give this lifes journey depth and texture and make living worth living.

  46. Kerry Wick says:

    Thank you for the site and God Bless you and all your family. Your tribute to Goldie was beautifull. If only all of humankind felt that way towards animals and people this would be a better world. Thank you again and God Bless…

  47. Ingo Kindermann says:

    I have a few goats and have had my first goat die. I am sorry about your loss.

  48. Ingo Kindermann says:

    I have a few goats and have had my first goat die. I am sorry about your loss. your tribute was beautiful.

  49. Patti Phelps says:

    I just had one of my favorite goats d ie the ot her day. What a tragedy, what a loss. Red Eye, a boar g oat was my buddy. I have a loss in my heart.

    I didn’t have her very long like you did Goldie. Goats are such lovable animals. I hope that your pain is lessening, it hurts rea lly bad for me right now.

    Patti

  50. Randi says:

    Molly, I don’t have any goats. I happened upon your site quite by accident, first reading and soaking up your tutorial on kidding…and then found your story- Goldie’s beautiful story- and was mesmerized. Goats are people. Love is love. Family…is family. Goat or no, I understand the love, the pain, the ache you experienced, and it wrenched my heart. Further…I think I want some goats! :) God bless you, Larry, and your family of many, tiny-eared Goldie legacies. When I get goats, I will come back here to brag…and I hope you remember me.

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